The death of children in Duxbury sparks a conversation about mental health treatment

                Massachusetts doctors are reminding people with mental health problems that they don't have to be in crisis to get treatment after the death of two children in Duxbury.  Plymouth County District Attorney Tim Cruz said first responders found three children unconscious and suffering from severe trauma in their Summer Street home Tuesday night.  Two of those children, 5-year-old Cora Clancy and 3-year-old Dawson Clancy, were pronounced dead at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Plymouth.  The third child, a 7-month-old boy, is still being treated at a Boston hospital.  The boy, whose identity is not known, will be 8 months old on Thursday.  According to Cruz, the children appear to have been strangled, but the state's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner is working to determine the cause and manner of death of Cora and Dawson Clancy.  The children's mother, 32-year-old Lindsay Clancy, was transported to a Boston hospital for treatment after she attempted suicide.  prosecutor.  At 8:20 p.m. on Wednesday, Cruz announced that an arrest warrant had been issued for Lindsay Clancy charging her with two counts of murder and three counts of strangulation and assault and battery with a deadly weapon.  police custody, but a representative from his office confirmed that Clancy is still hospitalized in Boston.  An update on her condition was not given.  What makes the situation even more striking to some is that Lindsay Clancy worked as a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital, which made her feel that coping resources may be close at hand but out of reach.  should be an open discussion from the start.  You shouldn't wait until you get to the point of, 'I can't get out of bed,'" said Chelsea resident Melissa Hulburt, the mother of a 7-week-old child. Hulburt is a 38-year-old first-time mother at who was diagnosed with anxiety and depression. She said she sought mental health care before giving birth to her baby. "It's nothing to be ashamed of," said Hulburt. "A lot of people feel like they're going crazy when they have really serious mental health issues," she said. Dr. Bobbi Wegner, a clinical psychologist and Harvard lecturer who founded the group connection platform Groops. "You feel a burden and want to absorb it, because you're responsible and that definitely contributes to the loneliness," said Hulburt. Wegner said some red flags include feelings of loneliness, trouble sleeping and difficulty focusing. "I mean, there were definitely dark thoughts about, 'Why?  Why do this?'" Hulburt said. "The reality in a psychosis for the person who experienced it is very real.  So voices someone might hear, or visions someone might see, is like you and I seeing reality," Wegner said. which is a psychotic break." Anyone who is in trouble and needs someone to talk to can call the national suicide and crisis helpline at 988. That helpline offers free and confidential emotional support 24 hours a day.
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                <strong class="dateline">BOSTON —</strong>                                          <p>Massachusetts doctors are reminding people with mental health problems that they don't have to be in crisis to get treatment after the death of two children in Duxbury.

Plymouth County District Attorney Tim Cruz said first responders found three children unconscious and severely traumatized in their Summer Street home on Tuesday night. Two of those children, 5-year-old Cora Clancy and 3-year-old Dawson Clancy, were pronounced dead at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Plymouth. The third child, a 7-month-old boy, is still being treated at a Boston hospital. The boy, whose identity is not yet known, will be 8 months old on Thursday.

Cruz said the children appeared to have been strangled, but the state’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner is working to determine the cause and manner of Cora and Dawson Clancy’s deaths.

The children’s mother, 32-year-old Lindsay Clancy, was transported to a Boston hospital for treatment after she attempted suicide, prompting her husband to call Duxbury police, according to the prosecutor.

At 8:20 p.m. on Wednesday, Cruz announced that an arrest warrant had been issued for Lindsay Clancy charging her with two counts of murder and three counts of strangulation and assault and battery with a deadly weapon.

Cruz said Clancy is now under police custody, but a representative from his office confirmed that Clancy remains hospitalized in Boston. An update on her condition was not provided.

What makes the situation even more striking to some is that Lindsay Clancy worked as a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital, which made her feel that coping resources may be close at hand but out of reach.

“It’s something that should be an open discussion from the start. You shouldn’t wait until you get to the point of, ‘I can’t get out of bed,'” said Chelsea resident Melissa Hulburt, the mother of one child of 7 weeks old.

Hulburt is a 38-year-old first-time mother who has been diagnosed with anxiety and depression. She said she sought mental health care before giving birth to her baby.

“It’s not something to be ashamed of,” Hulburt said.

“A lot of people feel like they’re going crazy when they have really serious mental health issues,” says Dr. Bobbi Wegner, a clinical psychologist and Harvard lecturer who founded the group connection platform Groops.

“You feel a burden and want to absorb it, because you’re responsible and that definitely adds to the loneliness,” Hulburt said.

Wegner said some red flags are feelings of loneliness, trouble sleeping and difficulty focusing.

“I mean, there were definitely dark thoughts of, ‘Why? Why do this?'” Hulburt said.

“The reality in psychosis for the person experiencing it is very real. So voices someone might hear, or visions someone might see, is like you and I seeing reality,” Wegner said. “There is generally an underlying mental illness, and then there can be a change of consciousness for the person who is a psychotic break.”

Wegner said mental health treatment doesn’t have to include medications, and the most important thing is to talk to someone.

Anyone who has problems and needs someone to talk to can call the national suicide and crisis helpline at 988. The helpline offers free and confidential emotional support 24 hours a day.

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The death of children in Duxbury sparks a conversation about mental health treatment

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