Mental health trumps parents’ worries about their children, survey – The Hill

Story summary


  • Four out of 10 parents in the United States are “extremely” or “very” worried about their child struggling with anxiety or depression at some point in their lives, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center.

  • The Pew Research Center surveyed more than 3,700 parents with children under 18 to learn about parenting in America today.

  • Parents interviewed were also very concerned about their children being bullied.

American parents are more concerned about their children’s mental health than other issues, according to a new survey.

A Pew Research Center survey of 3,757 parents with children under age 18 found that four in 10 parents are “extremely” or “very” concerned that their child will suffer from anxiety or depression in the future.

The second biggest concern among parents is about their children being bullied.

Of those surveyed, 35% said they are “extremely” or “very concerned” that their children will be bullied at some point in their lives.

Mothers are more likely than fathers to be concerned about their children’s mental health, the report found.

Nearly half of the mothers surveyed, or 46%, said they were “extremely” or “very” concerned that their children would develop anxiety or depression at some point in their lives.

Meanwhile, 32% of parents surveyed said the same thing.

Mothers are also more likely to worry that their children will be bullied than fathers.

More than 40% of mothers surveyed admitted they are concerned about their children being bullied, while 28% of parents said they are concerned about their children being bullied, according to the survey.

Differences in parental concerns also cut along racial and class lines, according to the study.

White and Hispanic parents are the most likely to be concerned about their children’s mental health. Of all parents surveyed, 42% of white parents and 43% of Hispanic parents said they are “extremely” or “very” concerned that their children might suffer from anxiety or depression.

More than 30% of black parents and 28% of Asian parents said the same.

Low-income parents were more likely to worry about their children developing mental health problems or being bullied.

Nearly half, or 48 percent, of low-income parents said they are “extremely” or “very” concerned about their child struggling with anxiety or depression and being bullied.

Of the middle-income parents surveyed, 38% said they are “very” or “extremely” concerned about their child suffering from anxiety or depression, and 33% said the same about their child being bullied.

A smaller percentage of high-income parents expressed serious concerns about their children’s mental health, with 32% reporting feeling “extremely” or “very” concerned that their children might develop anxiety or depression.

Likewise, 24% of high-income parents said they are concerned about their children being bullied.

But low-income parents ranked other concerns about the same as mental health and bullying.

Meanwhile, 44% of low-income parents said they are “extremely” or “very” worried about being kidnapped, and 41% and 40% said they are “extremely or very worried” about their children being beaten or attacked.

Mental health trumps parents’ worries about their children, survey – The Hill

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